Leg I Home Stretch!

September 20, 2018

With a couple days left to fish, we’re closing in on the end of leg 1!  It’s that point in the leg when everything begins to look familiar and routine may have taken over.  But if you’re patient and keep your eyes open, you’re sure to see something.  With that said, here are some highlights from the last couple of days!

We woke up to an announcement that a large pod of common dolphins were jumping and swimming straight towards the boat.  There were at least 50 of them!  The whole show lasted 5-10 minutes, and just like that, they were gone.  It’s amazing how quickly these sightings come and go.

Video by Jennifer Casey, NOAA Fisheries

We’ve been sampling in deeper water these last couple of days, and a neat Scorpaenidae fish came up in the net.  It may look similar to our black belly rosefishHelicolenus dactylopterus, but there are some noticeable differences.  This fish is a bright orange color and has one extremely long dorsal spine.  When the mouth is open, you’ll see a bright yellow throat while the blackbelly rosefish’s is, as you would expect, black.

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Scorpaenidae are a group of predatory marine fish that includes scoropionfishes or rockfishes,   Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

Some lobsters we catch have lost one or both of their arms.  Though, it’s not a permanent state because they can be regrown, and that’s exactly what one of the lobsters we caught was doing!  At first glance, it may seem like it has only one arm, but look closer, and you can see that a replacement arm has just started growing.

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Lobster regrowing a new arm.  Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

At another station, we caught a beautiful starfish. We are wondering if it belongs to the genus Coronaster.  This animal has 11 delicate arms and is an orange-red color.  After pictures were taken, some arms were detached.  It seemed odd for that to happen so quickly and after minimal handling.  Perhaps it could be some kind of defense mechanism.  It will be brought back to the lab for further identification.

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Coronaster is a species of starfish, or sea star. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun.

A benefit of being on day watch, noon to midnight, is the chance to witness amazing sunsets.  When the weather is just right, the sky can be remarkable, and it’s difficult to resist taking a moment to be still and enjoy the view.

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Some day watch scientists,  watching the sunset after working up a station. Left to right: Kelcie Bean, Zackery Fyke, Lacey Bluemel, and Jennifer Casey.

Christine Kircun
Aboard the FSV Henry B. Bigelow
Fall 2018 Bottom Trawl Survey Leg 1

Very Small but Very Important

Sept. 14, 2018

Despite Hurricane Florence’s destruction on the Carolina coasts, the FSV Henry B. Bigelow has kept sampling stations at a steady pace.  We are currently outside Long Island, well out of the reach of the hurricane’s wind and rain.  As of now, it’s all clear for us to keep sampling stations and working up fish, but fish aren’t the only thing we’re catching in nets.

The ocean is amazingly diverse.  There are well known animals such as tuna, cod, and whales.  They could be valued for recreational enjoyment, commercial importance or intrinsic pleasure.  And there are numerous animals such as starfish, sea urchins, jellyfish, corals, and sponges that are only found in the ocean.  But there are hundreds of easily overlooked, very small yet vitally important species that benefit all living creatures, aquatic and terrestrial: plankton.

Simply put, plankton are very small, sometimes microscopic animals (zooplankton) and plants (phytoplankton) that drift in the water.  Found in both fresh and salt water, they are the base of the aquatic food web.  Not just that, but phytoplankton produce about half of Earth’s oxygen!  Because of their crucial environmental role, it is extremely important to study and monitor these fascinating organisms, and we have a protocol for doing just that on the bottom trawl surveys.

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Bongo nets. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

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Survey Technician Mark Bradley spraying the contents of a plankton net into a sieve. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

Plankton tows are cast at select stations on the FSV Henry B. Bigelow.  This is called a ‘bongo’ because the two nets used look like bongos.  The bongo is lowered over the sidesampling station to about 5-10m from the bottom, depending on the ground type and weather conditions.  As soon as it reaches its appropriate depth, it’s brought back to the surface.  This gives us a vertical profile of the organisms in that area.The nets are washed down into a sieve, and the plankton are preserved with formalin in glass jars which will be examined back on land after the survey is completed.

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Jar filled with plankton. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

Before the jars are preserved, a quick, first glance may leave the observer uninterested.  But simply wait a moment, and the jar comes to life!  Depending on the sampling location and time of year, ostracods, copepods, protozoans, jellyfish, mysids…. can be seen moving and zooming all over.  So the next time you’re enjoying the beach and gazing out on the water, know that it is far from empty!  You are actually watching thousands and thousands of plankton, working hard to support life in the ocean and on land.  So take a deep breath and say “Thank you!”

Plankton studies is not my area of focus, but it is for the people in the NEFSC Oceans and Climate Branch!  Check out their website at Oceans and Climate Branch for more information.

Christine Kircun
Aboard the FSV Henry B. Bigelow
Fall 2018 Bottom Trawl Survey Leg 1

Approaching hurricane, sampling underway

September 11, 2018

We’re almost a week into leg I of the bottom trawl survey on the FSV Henry B. Bigelow, and it’s off to a great start!  Despite Hurricane Florence slowly approaching from the southeast, the weather has been absolutely gorgeous.  The water is flat, and the sky is full of beautiful clouds.  One of them briefly produced a water spout.

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Water spout forming. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

While off the coast of North Carolina, we saw the Diamond Shoals Lighthouse. With so many shoals along the coast of North Carolina, lighthouses were extremely important to warn sailors of the dangers below.

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Diamond Shoals Lighthouse. Photo credit: NOAa Fisheries/Christine Kircun

This lighthouse was eventually moved offshore because warning signals from land were ultimately ineffective.  Read more at http://lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=169.

And of course, it’s always exciting to see what the net brings up.  Most of the animals have been small, but a couple sizable specimens made it to our sampling stations.  Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) is a pelagic, flatheaded fish that spends most of its time alone except when they aggregate annually to mate.  Currently, efforts to domestically cultivate cobia for food are underway.

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Cobia. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

Grey triggerfish (Balistes capriscus) is found all along the eastern US coast.  These fish travel through the water with wave-like movements of their dorsal and anal fins.  They communicate with grunting and hissing noises.  Clicking noises are made when the teeth behind its fleshy lips are rubbed together.

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A grey triggerfish. Photo credit: NOAA Fisheries/Christine Kircun

The common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) is an intelligent cephalopod that eats bivalves (mollusks with two shells) and crabs.  They are known to leave the empty shells

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in what’s known as midden piles right outside whatever space they’ve decided to call home.  These piles are a unique way to show researchers what kind of bivalves and crabs are in the area since an octopus can more effectively comb through its habitat as it hunts for food.

Christine Kircun
Aboard the FSV Henry B. Bigelow
Fall Bottom Trawl Survey – Leg 1